Photos: John Lennon would’ve turned 77

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST 9 Photos
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In 1966, John Lennon took some time off from ‘The Beatles’ to play a young soldier, ‘Private Gripweed,’ in Richard Lester’s film ‘How I Won the War’, which was shot on location in Germany and Spain. During filming, Lennon started wearing round ’granny’ glasses, which later became one of his most distinctive identifiers. (Keystone / Getty Images)

In 1966, John Lennon took some time off from ‘The Beatles’ to play a young soldier, ‘Private Gripweed,’ in Richard Lester’s film ‘How I Won the War’, which was shot on location in Germany and Spain. During filming, Lennon started wearing round ’granny’ glasses, which later became one of his most distinctive identifiers. (Keystone / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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Based on a novel of the same name, the film, ‘How I Won the War’ starred Lennon in his only non-musical role. To prepare for the role, Lennon cut his hair short, in what was a huge departure from his his mop-top image. (Keystone Features / Getty Images)

Based on a novel of the same name, the film, ‘How I Won the War’ starred Lennon in his only non-musical role. To prepare for the role, Lennon cut his hair short, in what was a huge departure from his his mop-top image. (Keystone Features / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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Among the members of the Beatles, Lennon was known for his cool wit. Here from a charity show at the London Palladium in 1964, Hungarian born actress Zsa Zsa Gabor is seen falling into the arms of Paul McCartney as Lennon exhibits his indifference. (Keystone / Getty Images)

Among the members of the Beatles, Lennon was known for his cool wit. Here from a charity show at the London Palladium in 1964, Hungarian born actress Zsa Zsa Gabor is seen falling into the arms of Paul McCartney as Lennon exhibits his indifference. (Keystone / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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On 25th March 1969, John Lennon and his wife of a week, artist and activist Yoko Ono, received the press at their bedside in the Presidential Suite of the Hilton Hotel, Amsterdam. The couple stayed in bed for seven days ‘as a protest against war and violence in the world’. (Central Press / Getty Images)

On 25th March 1969, John Lennon and his wife of a week, artist and activist Yoko Ono, received the press at their bedside in the Presidential Suite of the Hilton Hotel, Amsterdam. The couple stayed in bed for seven days ‘as a protest against war and violence in the world’. (Central Press / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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Lennon and Yoko Ono had their run-ins with the law as seen here in October 1968, when they arrived outside the Marylebone Magistrates Court, London on two charges; the illegal possession of cannabis and obstructing police in the execution of a search warrant. (Bob Aylott / Keystone / Getty Images)

Lennon and Yoko Ono had their run-ins with the law as seen here in October 1968, when they arrived outside the Marylebone Magistrates Court, London on two charges; the illegal possession of cannabis and obstructing police in the execution of a search warrant. (Bob Aylott / Keystone / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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Seen driving out often in his customized Rolls Royce with fans on either side, this photograph is from Chertsey, Surrey, 1967. (Keystone / Getty images)

Seen driving out often in his customized Rolls Royce with fans on either side, this photograph is from Chertsey, Surrey, 1967. (Keystone / Getty images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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Lennon was a compulsive doodler apart from being a talented songwriter. His untitled illustration,‘Seven People and a Dog,’ in pen, was exhibited at Sotheby’s in March 2014 alongside drawings, poems and prose from the private collection of publisher Tom Maschler. (Peter Macdiarmid / Getty Images)

Lennon was a compulsive doodler apart from being a talented songwriter. His untitled illustration,‘Seven People and a Dog,’ in pen, was exhibited at Sotheby’s in March 2014 alongside drawings, poems and prose from the private collection of publisher Tom Maschler. (Peter Macdiarmid / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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Towards the end of 1968, Lennon’s focus had moved beyond The Beatles. He started recording with Yoko Ono and their public appearances of protest became photo opportunities for the media. Here seen singing a song in bed with Ono next to him, in a hotel bed in Canada on 1st March 1969. (Keystone Features / Getty Images)

Towards the end of 1968, Lennon’s focus had moved beyond The Beatles. He started recording with Yoko Ono and their public appearances of protest became photo opportunities for the media. Here seen singing a song in bed with Ono next to him, in a hotel bed in Canada on 1st March 1969. (Keystone Features / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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‘The All You Need is Love’ lyric manuscript in John Lennon’s original handwriting, as seen at the press preview of a major Lennon memorabilia collection at Club Cirque on June 27, 2005 in London, England. One of the most iconic songs from The Beatles repertoire, the song was written by Lennon but credited to both Lennon and Paul McCartney. (Chris Jackson / Getty Images)

‘The All You Need is Love’ lyric manuscript in John Lennon’s original handwriting, as seen at the press preview of a major Lennon memorabilia collection at Club Cirque on June 27, 2005 in London, England. One of the most iconic songs from The Beatles repertoire, the song was written by Lennon but credited to both Lennon and Paul McCartney. (Chris Jackson / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:09 AM IST
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