Universe through telescope

Updated On Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST
1 / 9
These Hubble space telescope images of Saturn, shown in this handout composite photo, captured from 1996 to 2000, depict the planet in different stages of its 29-year journey around the sun. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

These Hubble space telescope images of Saturn, shown in this handout composite photo, captured from 1996 to 2000, depict the planet in different stages of its 29-year journey around the sun. Reuters/File

2 / 9
This is an undated handout image of the massive star Eta Carinae in our Milky Way galaxy that experts believe might explode in a supernova at any time, based on data from the Hubble space telescope. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

This is an undated handout image of the massive star Eta Carinae in our Milky Way galaxy that experts believe might explode in a supernova at any time, based on data from the Hubble space telescope. Reuters/File

3 / 9
This Hubble space telescope image shows giant star-forming Nebula with massive young stellar clusters. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

This Hubble space telescope image shows giant star-forming Nebula with massive young stellar clusters. Reuters/File

4 / 9
Remnants from a star that exploded thousands of years ago and created a celestial abstract portrait, as captured in this NASA Hubble space telescope image of the Pencil Nebula. Officially known as NGC 2736, the Pencil Nebula is part of the huge Vela supernova remnant, located in the southern constellation Vela. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

Remnants from a star that exploded thousands of years ago and created a celestial abstract portrait, as captured in this NASA Hubble space telescope image of the Pencil Nebula. Officially known as NGC 2736, the Pencil Nebula is part of the huge Vela supernova remnant, located in the southern constellation Vela. Reuters/File

5 / 9
This NASA Hubble space telescope image captures the tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away from Earth in the southern constellation Carina. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

This NASA Hubble space telescope image captures the tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away from Earth in the southern constellation Carina. Reuters/File

6 / 9
Jubilant astronomers unveiled humankind's most spectacular views of the universe as captured by the NASA Hubble space telescope's new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The Cone Nebula, M17 is pictured in this NASA handout photo. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

Jubilant astronomers unveiled humankind's most spectacular views of the universe as captured by the NASA Hubble space telescope's new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The Cone Nebula, M17 is pictured in this NASA handout photo. Reuters/File

7 / 9
A new view of the Whirlpool Galaxy, one of the two largest and sharpest images Hubble space telescope has ever taken. The new Whirlpool Galaxy image showcases the spiral galaxy's curving arms where newborn stars reside and its yellowish central core that serves as home for older stars. Reuters/File/NASA Handout
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

A new view of the Whirlpool Galaxy, one of the two largest and sharpest images Hubble space telescope has ever taken. The new Whirlpool Galaxy image showcases the spiral galaxy's curving arms where newborn stars reside and its yellowish central core that serves as home for older stars. Reuters/File/NASA Handout

8 / 9
NASA's Hubble space telescope catches the Boomerang Nebula in this image taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in early 2005. Hubble's sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

NASA's Hubble space telescope catches the Boomerang Nebula in this image taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in early 2005. Hubble's sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground. Reuters/File

9 / 9
Star V838 Monocerotis's (V838 Mon) light echo, which is about six light years in diameter, is seen from the Hubble space telescope in this in this February 2004 handout photo released by NASA. It became the brightest star in the Milky Way Galaxy in January 2002 when its outer surface greatly expanded suddenly. Reuters/File
Updated on Apr 18, 2012 09:01 PM IST

Star V838 Monocerotis's (V838 Mon) light echo, which is about six light years in diameter, is seen from the Hubble space telescope in this in this February 2004 handout photo released by NASA. It became the brightest star in the Milky Way Galaxy in January 2002 when its outer surface greatly expanded suddenly. Reuters/File

SHARE
Story Saved
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Saturday, August 13, 2022
Start 15 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now