Children who live close to busy roads are more likely to get atopic dermatitis - Hindustan Times
close_game
close_game

Children who live close to busy roads are more likely to get atopic dermatitis: Study

ANI | | Posted by Tapatrisha Das, Washington
Jun 12, 2023 01:17 PM IST

The study explores how highly travelled highways have negtive impact on skin health in children, increasing the risk of atopic dermatitis.

The detrimental effects of air pollution from traffic on respiratory health have been well established, but experts from National Jewish Health are also examining how rising pollutants affect allergy disease, another area of health.

Children who live close to busy roads are more likely to get atopic dermatitis: Study(Shutterstock)
Children who live close to busy roads are more likely to get atopic dermatitis: Study(Shutterstock)

According to a recent study, highly travelled highways in the state of Colorado have negative effects on skin health in children, increasing the possibility of developing atopic dermatitis. Children who lived at least a thousand metres away from heavily used highways had a decreased risk of developing atopic dermatitis than those who lived within 500 metres.

Hindustan Times - your fastest source for breaking news! Read now.

ALSO READ: Forecast for skincare: Are you keeping up with the climate?

"These findings highlight the importance of having environmental interventions designed to decrease exposure to traffic in young children," said Jessica Hui, MD, senior author of the study, and a pediatric allergist and immunologist at National Jewish Health.

Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, commonly occurs in children and can lead to a progression of allergic diseases, also known as the atopic march. Nearly 10 million children in the U.S. have atopic dermatitis, and one-third have moderate to severe disease.

"The surface of the skin in children with atopic dermatitis is leaky and prone to exposure to environmental hazards, which can lead to an allergic inflammatory response, possibly resulting in food allergies, asthma and other problems," said Michael Nevid, MD, first author of the study, and a pediatric allergist and immunologist at National Jewish Health.

For the study, researchers reviewed charts of patients 0-18 years of age who had been seen at National Jewish Health in Denver, from 2008 to 2021. Residential distances from highly trafficked roads for people with atopic dermatitis and controls without atopic dermatitis were calculated. Highway and local road traffic data was obtained from the Colorado Department of Transportation. Highly trafficked areas were defined as roads or highways with annual average daily traffic of over 10,000 vehicles.

Unlock a world of Benefits with HT! From insightful newsletters to real-time news alerts and a personalized news feed – it's all here, just a click away! - Login Now!

Check Latest News on Lifestyle, Fashion and Anti-Valentine's Week 2024 List along with Festivals and Travel at Hindustan Times.
This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.
SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Share this article
SHARE
Story Saved
Live Score
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Thursday, February 22, 2024
Start 14 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now
Follow Us On