Maharashtra stands 10th in cases of failed vasectomy in India | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Maharashtra stands 10th in cases of failed vasectomy in India

Odisha leads the list, with 7821 failed vasectomies, followed by Uttar Pradesh and Karnataka with 1814 and 887 failed vasectomies, respectively.

mumbai Updated: Feb 08, 2018 00:30 IST
Sadaguru Pandit
Vasectom refers to a 15-minute procedure wherein a tube known as vas deferens is cut in order to prevent the flow of sperm.
Vasectom refers to a 15-minute procedure wherein a tube known as vas deferens is cut in order to prevent the flow of sperm.(Shutterstock)

Data from the ministry of health and family welfare has revealed that 15,529 vasectomies have failed in the last ten years. Odisha leads the list, with 7821 failed vasectomies, followed by Uttar Pradesh and Karnataka with 1814 and 887 failed vasectomies, respectively. Maharashtra is tenth in the list, with 260 cases recorded since 2008.

Vasectomy, considered the most effective surgical method of birth control, refers to a 15-minute procedure wherein a tube known as vas deferens is cut in order to prevent the flow of sperm.

The data also suggests that the number of failed surgeries has dropped extensively, decreasing from 8317 to 199 in 2008, and to 199 in 2017. However, the number has remained stable in the state with districts such as Akola (76), Amravati (50) and Bhandara (32) recording the highest numbers. The state has seen 24, 32, and 28 failed procedures in 2015, 2016, and 2017, respectively.

The internationally accepted rate of vasectomy failures is 0.5% of the total cases and India falls within this limit, said Dr S K Sikdar, deputy commissioner for family planning, ministry of health and family welfare.

“The reason for failure in some cases is caused by the tendency of the vas deferns tissue to reunite even after being severed. This is not a mistake on the part of the doctor, and is a part of the consent forms filled by the patients prior to the surgery,” said Sikdar.

He added that all patients are compensated if the surgery fails, as per ministry norms. According to a notification released on July 18, 2014 by the department, failed sterilisation surgery is compensated with Rs30,000; cost of treatment up to 60 days arising out of complication following the procedure is compensated with Rs 25000, and deaths are compensated with Rs 2,00,000.

Chetan Kothari, who accessed this information through an application under the Right To Information (RTI) Act from the ministry, said that the ministry has paid over Rs1 crore as compensation to patients in the last three years alone. “Unwanted pregnancies cause emotional and financial strain to the family. Since more cases are reported from rural areas, it shows that there is a lack of expertise in these areas,” said Kothari.

“Urban areas of Maharashtra have reported very little or almost no cases in recent years. Even the overall figures are decreasing gradually and they will come under control once the medical infrastructure in rural parts of the state is developed,” said the official.

Dr Sikdar added that the data, accessed from online platform of the ministry has shortcomings and can’t be taken on the face value. “We are trying our best to tabulate the data correctly so as to avoid misrepresentation,” said Dr Sikdar.