Eastern Christians celebrate Christmas

UPDATED ON JAN 07, 2017 04:38 PM IST 20 Photos
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An Ethiopian Orthodox pilgrim holds a candle during the Ethiopian Christmas Eve vigil around Bete Maryam (House of Marry) monolithic church in Lalibela, Ethiopia. Eastern Christians celebrate Christmas on January 7, while those in the West observe it on December 25 due to differences between the Julian and Gregorian calendars. (Tiksa Negeri/Reuters)

An Ethiopian Orthodox pilgrim holds a candle during the Ethiopian Christmas Eve vigil around Bete Maryam (House of Marry) monolithic church in Lalibela, Ethiopia. Eastern Christians celebrate Christmas on January 7, while those in the West observe it on December 25 due to differences between the Julian and Gregorian calendars. (Tiksa Negeri/Reuters)

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Women pray during the Vigil mass at the Russian Orthodox church Saint Serge in Paris on the eve of Orthodox Christmas Day, which is celebrated on January 7. Eastern Christians celebrate Christmas on January 7, while those in the West observe it on December 25 due to differences between the Julian and Gregorian calendars. (Philippe Wojazer/REUTERS)

Women pray during the Vigil mass at the Russian Orthodox church Saint Serge in Paris on the eve of Orthodox Christmas Day, which is celebrated on January 7. Eastern Christians celebrate Christmas on January 7, while those in the West observe it on December 25 due to differences between the Julian and Gregorian calendars. (Philippe Wojazer/REUTERS)

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Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem Theophilos III leads a midnight mass at the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem, in the traditional birthplace of Jesus Christ. Eastern Christians celebrate Christmas on January 7, while those in the West observe it on December 25 due to differences between the Julian and Gregorian calendars. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem Theophilos III leads a midnight mass at the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem, in the traditional birthplace of Jesus Christ. Eastern Christians celebrate Christmas on January 7, while those in the West observe it on December 25 due to differences between the Julian and Gregorian calendars. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

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An Ethiopian Orthodox pilgrim arrives for the Ethiopian Christmas Eve vigil around Bete Maryam (House of Mary) monolithic church in Lalibela, Ethiopia. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

An Ethiopian Orthodox pilgrim arrives for the Ethiopian Christmas Eve vigil around Bete Maryam (House of Mary) monolithic church in Lalibela, Ethiopia. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

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Ethiopian Orthodox choir members perform during Ethiopian Christmas Eve celebration. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

Ethiopian Orthodox choir members perform during Ethiopian Christmas Eve celebration. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

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Ethiopian Orthodox choir members perform during the Ethiopian Christmas Eve celebration. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

Ethiopian Orthodox choir members perform during the Ethiopian Christmas Eve celebration. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

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Arytyian Greek Orthodox worshippers celebrate at manager square in front of the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

Arytyian Greek Orthodox worshippers celebrate at manager square in front of the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

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Ethiopian Orthodox faithful arrive for a morning prayer at a rock hewn church ahead of Ethiopian Christmas. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

Ethiopian Orthodox faithful arrive for a morning prayer at a rock hewn church ahead of Ethiopian Christmas. (Tiksa Negeri/REUTERS)

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An Ethiopian Orthodox monk prays within a rock hewn church ahead of Ethiopian Christmas. (REUTERS)

An Ethiopian Orthodox monk prays within a rock hewn church ahead of Ethiopian Christmas. (REUTERS)

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Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem Theophilos III (C) leads the midnight mass at the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem Theophilos III (C) leads the midnight mass at the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

UPDATED ON JAN 07, 2017 04:38 PM IST
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Arytyian Greek Orthodox worshippers celebrate at manager square in front of the Church of the Nativity. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

Arytyian Greek Orthodox worshippers celebrate at manager square in front of the Church of the Nativity. (MUSA AL SHAER/AFP)

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Children listen as Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill serves the Christmas Mass in the Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP)

Children listen as Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill serves the Christmas Mass in the Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP)

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Believers listen as Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill serves the Christmas Mass in the Christ the Savior Cathedralin. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP)

Believers listen as Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill serves the Christmas Mass in the Christ the Savior Cathedralin. (Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP)

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Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill serves the Christmas Mass in the Christ the Savior Cathedral as Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas in accordance with the Julian calendar. (Ivan Sekretarev/AP)

Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill serves the Christmas Mass in the Christ the Savior Cathedral as Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas in accordance with the Julian calendar. (Ivan Sekretarev/AP)

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A child lights a candle, during the liturgy on Orthodox Christmas Eve in the Prechistensky, the Cathedral Palace in Vilnius, Lithuania. (Mindaugas Kulbis/AP)

A child lights a candle, during the liturgy on Orthodox Christmas Eve in the Prechistensky, the Cathedral Palace in Vilnius, Lithuania. (Mindaugas Kulbis/AP)

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Children pray in the Church of the Holy Prophet Elijah during the eve of Orthodox Christmas in Sokolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. (Dado Ruvic/REUTERS)

Children pray in the Church of the Holy Prophet Elijah during the eve of Orthodox Christmas in Sokolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. (Dado Ruvic/REUTERS)

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Greek Orthodox clergy parade in Manger Square outside the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem. (Hazem Bader/AFP)

Greek Orthodox clergy parade in Manger Square outside the Church of the Nativity in the biblical West Bank town of Bethlehem. (Hazem Bader/AFP)

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Greek Orthodox clergy parade in Manger Square. (Hazem Bader/AFP)

Greek Orthodox clergy parade in Manger Square. (Hazem Bader/AFP)

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Palestinian Orthodox Christian altar boys attend a Christmas mass at the Saint Porphyrios Greek Orthodox church in Gaza City. (Mahmud Hams/AFP)

Palestinian Orthodox Christian altar boys attend a Christmas mass at the Saint Porphyrios Greek Orthodox church in Gaza City. (Mahmud Hams/AFP)

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People watch fireworks in front Church of the Holy Prophet Elijah during the eve of the Orthodox Christmas in Sokolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. (Dado Ruvic/REUTERS)

People watch fireworks in front Church of the Holy Prophet Elijah during the eve of the Orthodox Christmas in Sokolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina. (Dado Ruvic/REUTERS)

UPDATED ON JAN 07, 2017 04:38 PM IST

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