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Home / Delhi News / Patients with SARI to not be tested via rapid antigen method, orders govt

Patients with SARI to not be tested via rapid antigen method, orders govt

This comes after the Delhi high court directed the state government to adhere to the guidelines of the Indian Council of Medical Research, which does not include it in its criteria for using the point-of-care tests that can give results within 15 minutes.

delhi Updated: Jul 31, 2020 07:19 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
Health workers in PPE suits take a man’s swab sample for a coronavirus test, at Lok Nayak Jai Prakash (LNJP) Hospital, in New Delhi.
Health workers in PPE suits take a man’s swab sample for a coronavirus test, at Lok Nayak Jai Prakash (LNJP) Hospital, in New Delhi. (HT photo)

The Delhi government on Thursday removed patients admitted to hospitals with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SARI) from the list of high-risk individuals to be tested for the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) via the rapid antigen method. This comes after the Delhi high court directed the state government to adhere to the guidelines of the Indian Council of Medical Research, which does not include it in its criteria for using the point-of-care tests that can give results within 15 minutes.

“…testing strategies… using Rapid Antigen Detection test are hereby amended by deleting ‘All patients admitted with SARI’ from the list of high risk group of individuals who are compulsorily required to be tested for Covid-19 using Rapid Antigen Detection test with immediate effect,” the order by principal health secretary Vikram Dev Dutt read.

The category has been removed from the government orders of July 5 and 7, which will now use rapid antigen tests only for those with influenza-like illnesses, hospitalised patients undergoing chemotherapy, those who are immunocompromised, including those living with HIV, patients who have cancer, transplant patients, and those above the age of 65 with comorbid conditions such as diabetes and hypertension.

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