CBSE paper leak: Delhi Police say 25 people, including students, questioned | education | Hindustan Times
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CBSE paper leak: Delhi Police say 25 people, including students, questioned

Delhi Police said the main suspect is the owner of a coaching centre in Delhi’s Rajinder Nagar. The Delhi University pass-out is believed to have leaked the Class 12 Economics paper.

education Updated: Mar 29, 2018 21:23 IST
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HTC & Agencies
New Delhi
Delhi Police special commissioner RP Upadhyaya speaks to the media on Thursday.
Delhi Police special commissioner RP Upadhyaya speaks to the media on Thursday.(ABI Twitter)

The Delhi Policewere on Thursday questioning the owner of a coaching centre who was named in a complaint by the CBSE, which was forced to order re-testsfor classes 10 and 12 after a leak of question papers.

The owner who has an institute in the city’s Rajinder Nagar area was a Delhi University pass-out and suspected to have leaked the Class 12 economics paper, an official said. He used to teach mathematics and economics and was one of the main suspects, said the official privy to the probe being carried out by the Delhi Police’s crime branch.

“We have questioned 25-30 people, 18 students, five tutors and others,” said special commissioner of police (crime branch) RP Upadhyaya.

Police were trying to establish the trail — who leaked the paper, how was it transmitted and who were the beneficiaries, he said.

“We have no information that CBSE paper leak is pan-India, but if such a thing emerges, we will send teams outside Delhi,” Upadhyaya said.

Read: CBSE paper leaks: Students take to streets; Congress demands HRD minister Javadekar’s sacking

While Class 10 students would have to re-sit mathematics, Class 12 students will repeat economics exam, the Central Board of Secondary Education said on Wednesday, an order that impacts around than two million children across the country.

So far, police had not found a clue that pointed to the involvement of anyone in CBSE, the official familiar with the probe said

“It is too early to say that CBSE officials are involved or not, but the investigation so far does not indicate such a thing,” he said. Police had spoken to some students, coaching institutes and their teachers who had received copies of the leaked papers to ascertain the source of the leak, the official said.

The leak has snowballed into a major issue, with students venting their frustration on Twitter and criticising the board for its failure to maintain the sanctity of the examination.

The Delhi Police were trying to identify the users of the phone numbers from which WhatsApp messages with handwritten questions were circulated.

On March 26, the exam day, panic gripped students of Class 12 following claims on social media that the economics paper had been leaked though CBSE denied any slip-up.

A similar scene played out on Wednesday and by the time Class 10 students were done with the maths exam, the board had announced the re-test.

Read: CBSE paper leak, re-exam: cause of anxiety for Pune students

The government that has faced criticism termed the leak as “unfortunate” and said culprits would not go scot-free.

This is perhaps the first time that CBSE has been forced to order re-tests for all students. Earlier, such an exercise has been limited to a few centres.

“The police is on the job and I am very sure, they will nab the culprits as they have done in case of the SSC exam leak case. We have also instituted an internal inquiry,” human resource development minister Prakash Javadekar told a press conference.

The minister said he could not sleep on Wednesday night and understood “the pain, anguish and frustrations” of students and parents because “we are one with them”. He said all efforts would be made to improve the system to make it foolproof.

New dates are expected to be announced within a week, before the board examinations wind up. Students of Class 12 are worried that the re-test could clash with entrance exams that most of write to get into colleges and courses of their choice.