Supreme Court Collegium, on February 12, recommended the transfer of three high court judges(Sonu Mehta/HT PHOTO)
Supreme Court Collegium, on February 12, recommended the transfer of three high court judges(Sonu Mehta/HT PHOTO)

Supreme Court collegium transfers 3 High Court judges

The decision of the Collegium to transfer justice Muralidhar has come in for criticism from the Delhi high court bar which has called for abstention of work on Thursday to register its protest against the collegium’s decision.
Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By HT Correspondent
PUBLISHED ON FEB 20, 2020 03:30 AM IST

The Supreme Court Collegium, on February 12, recommended the transfer of three high court judges — Justice S Muralidhar from Delhi high court to Punjab & Haryana high court , Justice Ranjit More from Bombay high court to Meghalaya and Justice Ravi Vijaykumar Malimath from Karnataka to Uttarakhand high court.

The decision of the Collegium to transfer justice Muralidhar has come in for criticism from the Delhi high court bar which has called for abstention of work on Thursday to register its protest against the collegium’s decision.

Justice Muralidhar started his legal practice in 1984 in Chennai before moving to Delhi in 1987. He was appointed judge of Delhi high court in 2006 and has authored many landmark judgments.

Justice More enrolled as an advocate in September, 1983 and worked as a junior to former Delhi high court Chief Justice AP Shah. He was elevated as Bombay high court judge in September 2006.

Justice Malimath, who started his law practice in 1987, was appointed Karnataka high court judge in February 2008.

Notably, all three judges are on the top of the seniority bracket in their respective high courts. Justice Muralidhar is the third senior most judge of the Delhi high court and will become the second senior-most judge on March 11 when justice GS Sistani retires.

Justice Ranjit More is the fourth senior-most judge of Bombay high court while justice Malimath is the second senior-most judge in Karnataka high court.

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