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Pollutants levels in Mula-Mutha river at all-time high, again

According to the data revealed by PMC in its ESR report, a consistent rise in levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) has been recorded in the last year

pune Updated: Jul 27, 2018 17:24 IST
Parth Welankar
Parth Welankar
Hindustan Times, Pune
pune,mula-mutha,river
The water quality was monitored and analysed by PMC at eight different locations in city viz. Aundh, Mula Pawana confluence, Harris bridge, Holkar bridge, Wakdewadi, Sangam bridge, Yerwada and Mundhwa. (HT PHOTO)

The environment status report (ESR) 2017-2018, recently published by the Pune municipal corporation, has brought to light the issue of rising amount of pollutants in the Mula-Mutha river in the city yet again.

According to the data revealed by PMC in its ESR report, a consistent rise in levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) has been recorded in the last year.

According to experts, BOD and COD are the main parameters analysed to indicate the degree of pollution in the river.While BOD is the measurement of the amount of oxygen biologically required to decompose organic matter under aerobic conditions, COD is the measurement of total oxygen required to oxidise all biologically available and inert organic matter into carbon dioxide and water.

The water quality was monitored and analysed by PMC at eight different locations in city viz. Aundh, Mula Pawana confluence, Harris bridge, Holkar bridge, Wakdewadi, Sangam bridge, Yerwada and Mundhwa.

According to the ESR report, COD rose to 180 mg/l and the BOD was recorded at 60mg/l.

Mangesh Dighe, environment officer of the Pune municipal corporation (PMC), pointed at rising population in the city as one of the major reasons behind the high pollution.

He said, “Currently, only 75 per cent of raw sewage is being treated. The river pollution will be curtailed to a large extent once the ₹1,000-crore Mula-Mutha river development project is completed.”

Shailaja Deshpande, director of Jeevitnadi (living river) foundation, said, “Mutha is almost dead because it is not flowing consistently. The river’s flow is dependent on the will of the irrigation department.”

She added that residents are also responsible for the high pollution because of the increased use of detergents and cleaning products. Deshpande said that chemical detergents were harmful for marine biodiversity as well.

First Published: Jul 27, 2018 17:23 IST