Nasa has a Halloween special for you: Spooky sounds from space to ‘make your skin crawl’ | science | Hindustan Times
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Nasa has a Halloween special for you: Spooky sounds from space to ‘make your skin crawl’

Nasa has released spooky sounds from space “to make your skin crawl”.

science Updated: Oct 30, 2017 13:11 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
This artist rendering provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T Pyle depicts one possible appearance of the planet Kepler-452b, the first near-Earth-size world to be found in the habitable zone of a star that is similar to our sun.
This artist rendering provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech/T Pyle depicts one possible appearance of the planet Kepler-452b, the first near-Earth-size world to be found in the habitable zone of a star that is similar to our sun.(AP Photo)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has a Halloween special for you: a compilation of elusive sounds of howling planets and whistling helium that the US agency says “is sure to make your skin crawl”.

“Soaring to the depths of our universe, gallant spacecraft roam the cosmos, snapping images of celestial wonders. Some spacecraft have instruments capable of capturing radio emissions. When scientists convert these to sound waves, the results are eerie to hear,” Nasa says on its website.

Here is the description of the sounds, as released by Nasa:

*NASA’s Juno spacecraft captures the ‘roar’ of Jupiter.

*Plasma Waves, like the roaring ocean surf, create a rhythmic cacophony across space.

*Saturn is a source of intense radio emissions, which were monitored by Nasa’s Cassini spacecraft.

*In 1996, the Galileo spacecraft made the first flyby of Jupiter’s largest moon, Ganymede. An audio picked by the spacecraft shows data from Galileo’s Plasma Wave Experiment instrument.

*During its February 14, 2011, flyby of comet Tempel 1, an instrument on the protective shield on NASA’s Stardust spacecraft was pelted by dust particles and small rocks. This was captured on audio by the US space agency.