Deceased artists among this year's top Grammy winners | india | Hindustan Times
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Deceased artists among this year's top Grammy winners

It's never too late to win a Grammy. Several deceased artists scored victories Sunday night, including two each by Warren Zevon and June Carter Cash, and one by Cash's husband, Johnny.

india Updated: Feb 09, 2004 17:19 IST

It's never too late to win a Grammy. Several deceased artists scored victories Sunday night, including two each by Warren Zevon and June Carter Cash, and one by Cash's husband, Johnny.

Carter Cash, who died in May, won female country vocal performance for "Keep On the Sunny Side," and the traditional folk album trophy for "Wildwood Flower."

"My mother's heart never, it may give up in body but it never did in spirit, you know, she kept on going," said John Carter Cash, who accepted on her behalf. "She's laughing and dancing somewhere."

Johnny Cash, who died in September, won short form music video for "Hurt," a song about drug addiction that he recorded in 2002. It was his 12th career Grammy.

"I really don't think it's because they passed away, I don't think it's a sympathy vote," country singer and Grammy winner Ricky Skaggs said. "I really think that it was because Johnny Cash is probably the most popular human being of our lifetime. There's never been a bigger star."

Zevon scored his first two career Grammy victories five months after dying of cancer. He completed "The Wind" in the final months of his life, and it won contemporary folk album. One of its songs, the raucous "Disorder in the House," won Zevon and Bruce Springsteen the Grammy for best rock performance by a duo or group with vocal.

A witty and irreverent lyricist whose songs often poked fun at death and failed relationships, Zevon was a critical but not a commercial success. Winning two trophies surely would have provoked his twisted sense of humor.

"His hard-boiled side would say, 'I don't care about this. These people never got me,"' said Jorge Calderon, the musician's producer and longtime friend.

"His other side, which was very Sammy Davis Jr., that part of him would be loving it. He'd be dressed in an all-cashmere suit. He'd be here digging it."

For his survivors, it was vindication.

"Oh man. Dad, what are you doing to me?" Zevon's son, Jordan, said as he accepted the award for "Disorder in the House." "Well, all the people tonight when you get home _ all the parents _ and your kids say, `Mom, Dad, who's Warren Zevon?' Do us a favor and add an incredible father to the description. The album has one soul but it has many hearts," he said.

Other deceased winners were: George Harrison, "Marwa Blues," pop instrumental performance; Celia Cruz, "Regalo Del Alma," salsa-merengue album; and Sam Cooke, "Legend," short form music video.

Harrison died of cancer in 2001; Cruz died of a brain tumor in July; and soul singer Cooke was shot to death in 1964. Cooke also was a first-time winner; Cruz won her second; and Harrison, the former Beatle, earned his fourth solo Grammy.