UK suspends NRI doc for negligence | india | Hindustan Times
  • Saturday, Jun 23, 2018
  •   °C  
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 23, 2018-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

UK suspends NRI doc for negligence

Amit has been suspended for a year after being convicted of manslaughter.

india Updated: Nov 26, 2005 10:42 IST

Another doctor of Indian origin in Britain has been suspended by medical authorities from working for a year after being convicted of manslaughter.

Amit Misra, who worked at Newcastle's Freeman Hospital, was given a suspended prison sentence following the death of a patient in June 2000.

At the time of the incident, Misra had been working at Southampton General Hospital when he failed to spot a severe infection in patient Sean Phillips, 31, who fell ill after a routine knee operation and later died.

Misra's colleague, Rajeev Srivastava, has also been suspended but his suspension period is six months.

Misra, who now works in India, was told by the General Medical Council that his fitness to practise was impaired.

He could have been struck off, but the panel instead opted to suspend him from working in this country for 12 months.

General Medical Council (GMC) chairperson Jacqueline Mitten said: "On balance, the panel found that despite the serious nature of the offence for which you were convicted, yours is an exceptional case for which a period of suspension would be an appropriate sanction.

"In order to protect the public, the panel has determined your suspension should be for a period of 12 months.

"You should have had the clinical expertise to recognise that Mr Phillips was very ill, even though an actual diagnosis was difficult to make.

"You should have been more familiar with the procedures and aware of systems in place at the hospital."

Misra earlier told the hearing: "I terribly regret the death of Sean Phillips.

"If we could turn the clock back, we would have been more aggressive treating him and perhaps changed the outcome.

"I do accept it was a serious and significant mistake, but I do not accept it was so significant it was criminal."