Development Plan 2034: Experts in Mumbai step up to save open spaces, heritage structures | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Development Plan 2034: Experts in Mumbai step up to save open spaces, heritage structures

Will send objections to rules that will open up public land for misuse

mumbai Updated: May 22, 2018 11:23 IST
Sagar Pillai
Sagar Pillai
Hindustan Times
Development plan Mumbai,development plan,Mumbai
The deadline for filing suggestions and objections for the excluded part of DP is June 7(HT Photo)

Two weeks after the state gave nod to the development plan (DP) 2034, citizens and urban planners have raised concerns over its provisions, which they claim will allow “exploitation of public land and give away open spaces to private entities”.

A part of the DP and Development Control and Promotion Regulations (rules for execution of DP) is still open for suggestions and objections. The deadline for filing suggestions and objections for the excluded part of DP is June 7.

According to the citizens, the plan has changed the use of open plots to public from public amenity, public open space and public land, which will allow arbitrary private use with no clarification. In a meeting held by the Urban Design Research Institute (UDRI), citizen groups and urban planners discussed various complex provisions that lacked clarity on standards for high-rises and open spaces.

Pankaj Joshi, executive director of UDRI, said, “According to the new rule, the commissioner has to constitute a committee for high-rises, to advise on issues related to buildings that are taller than 120m. This is in violation of the Supreme Court judgment, which implies that buildings above 70m will be scrutinised by the committee.”

The research institute raised serious concerns over dilution of standards for high-rises, heritage regulations and plot-side margins. Joshi said, “The municipal commissioner can override the decisions taken by the Mumbai Heritage Conservation Committee. Also, the committee is substantially diluted, putting important heritage structures under serious threat. The commissioner can after examining the available amenities in an area decide that an existing amenity is no longer required, which makes the city’s already scarce open spaces vulnerable.”

Citizens’ grouse is the state government is expecting objections, even as the maps of the development plan and report are yet to be released. Citizens and urban planners will now send suggestions and objections to the state government.